Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Alice In Wonderland

If you are expecting a review of the Disney version of Alice in Wonderland, I need to warn you up front, that's not what you're going to read. Now that you've been forwarned, let's get on with the review of one of my favorite classic books.




I have always been fanscinated by Lewis Carroll's tales of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. People today consider Alice in Wonderland a nice children's story, but upon closer examination, the obscure symbolism and meaning Lewis Carroll incorporates into the text is uniquely mature. But even though there are greater meanings behind the scattered prose, on almost every page there is something that will make you laugh out loud.

He tells the story from an innocent girl's point of view. I must admit, I have always been a little distrubed by his obsession with young girls, but I digress. Mr. Carroll uses a confusing and random plotline to create a satire of society. Some chapters need to be read multiple times to absorb what is actually going on. In the beginning, the story is very puzzling; on the surface, Alice is simply following the White Rabbit down the rabbit hole. This wackiness and disordered organization, although it may lead to making the reader confused, serves a higher purpose in understanding the story. Written in 1865, this book strongly emphasizes corruption and insensibility in society.

Overall, Alice in Wonderland is one of my favorite books; I loved it as a child, but I have a greater appreciation of this classic now that I'm an adult. I actually wrote my college thesis on the implications of Alice in Wonderland on modern society, helping me gain a new perspective on how our society works. You quickly became accustomed to the writing style and began to appreciate the themes and messages it contains.

Everyone should read Alice in Wonderland at least once. Not only does it contain powerful themes about corruption and chaos in society that everyone can learn from. However, it should not be read only once, lest much of the meaning be initially misconstrued as unimportant nonsense. It must be examined thoroughly to obtain the most amount of personal growth.

7 comments:

Rhinoa said...

I do like this novel but I prefer the sequel Through the Looking-Glass. You should definitely try The Looking Glass Wars and Seeing Redd by Frank Beddor which are a young adult re-invention of Wonderland and Alyss.

bekkah said...

The edition I have includes both Alice in Wonderland AND Through the Looking Glass. It's been on my shelf, unread, for YEARS.

Your post has inspired me! I think I'll tackle A Farewell to Arms next (my Aug Classics Challenge), then Breaking Dawn (w00t!), then Alice...

Nicola said...

I agree I love Alice in Wonderland but have to say I do not care for Through the Looking Glass at all. I've read Wonderland as a child and twice more, once to each of my boys. And they both loved it too!

Shellmo said...

Been a long time since I"ve thought about Alice in Wonderland. Your review makes me want to find it again to read.

Stephanie said...

I so have to read this!!

I also wanted you to know, I nominated you for a blog award. Come by and see!

Stacy's Designs 88 said...

That is totally neat...I never thought about the implications behind his story. I'm going to have to read this book again with a different pair of "eyes". Thanks for this refreshing take on an old childhood classic. ;) Stacy

Kat said...

I cannot wait to read these. Actually I can't believe I haven't read them already. I have them on my 888 list and will be digging in soon.

Have you read the "romantica" versions? Cheyenne McCray's "Wonderland" series. Kinda a S&M version :-)