Thursday, November 20, 2008

Archibald's Swiss Cheese Mountain

Archibald's Swiss Cheese Mountain by Sylvia Lieberman; illustrated by Jeremy Wendell

Reading level: Ages 4-8
Hardcover: 48 pages
Publisher: Seven Locks Press (October 19, 2007)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0979585252
ISBN-13: 978-0979585258

Forget Mickey Mouse, welcome to the world of Archibald, an adorable mouse with a big heart and a grand sense of adventure. Archibald is finally big enough to go into the world alone and find his own food. Mother has taught him to never enter a opening unless his whiskers fit, "If your whiskers fit, so will the rest of you, my son."

Archibald soon learns that being on his own can be scary. When he discovers Swiss Cheese Mountain, he knows this will feed him for a very long time. But tackling Swiss Cheese Mountain is just the beginning of his troubles!

Archibald is so cute and curious, children will enjoy reading of his adventures. The illustrations are wonderful and they really depict the true nature of this special little mouse.

I love the dedication in this book:
Archibald's Swiss Cheese Mountain is dedicated to children all over the world who have ever felt hungry for food, love or adventure.

This book was the winner of the Best Children's Book Hollywood Book Festival Competition 2008 - congratulations!

9 comments:

Stephanie said...

Looks like a cute book. My daughter would probably love it!!

By the way, I tagged you for a meme. Hope you don't mind!

Jon Goldman said...
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Sara said...
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None of your business said...
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Keith Crilow said...
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Pamela B. Rutledge, PhD, MBA said...

You can check a psychologist’s credentials at state licensing boards. You can also call the person’s office and ask for references. A media psychologist does not do clinical work. If someone calls themselves a psychologist and offers clinical services, they must be licensed by the state. This is not true of research psychologists, which is the category that media psychology falls into. Also, don’t make the mistake of thinking that a clinical psychologist who appears in the media is the same thing as a media psychologist who studies the psychological aspects of media applications and use.
I hope this is helpful.
Best regards,
Pam Rutledge


--
Pamela B. Rutledge, PhD, MBA
Media Psychology Research Center
prutledge@mprcenter.org